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« Botargo | Main | Address to a Haggis; Part II »

November 13, 2007

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Rachel Laudan

And then there's that great German lard spread with apple and onion. Is it called Himmel und Erde or is my memory playing tricks?

I know of no British lard spread. It was a sign of being so poor you couldn't afford marge when I was a child. But there was dripping. Oh glory, the soft beef fat with the rich brown goo underneath (never enough to go round)spread on bread and sprinkled with salt.

I don't see any sign of Mexicans using lard as a spread. Mayonnaise is the preferred spread.

Basil K

"Lardy Bread" is quite common here in Hungary. It is an unpretentious, rural kind of food. Looked down upon by yuppies, it is regularly sold in student bars topped with red onion and sweet paprika. It is a "beer skate", ie. a cheap snack that facilitates downing pint after pint of beer.

Basil K

Oh, and the lard used is pure white pig fat, sold by the kilo in supermarkets.

Adam Balic

In Hungary you may have heard of the Mangalitza breed of pig? These are famous for their woolly coats, but also are a produce very good quality lard. I bought a slab of smoked lard from this breed of pig last time I was in Vienna. Unfortunately, there is little room in the modern world of pig raising for breeds of pigs which produce such an abundance of fat.

gary

Another type of colored lard is used by Caribbean Hispanic cooks -- the fat is heated with annato seeds (achiote), then strained and cooled for storage.

It is used primarily for its color, 'though it does have a subtly nutty flavor and curious aroma that will be immediately recognizable to anyone who has experienced Puerto Rican dishes of the Chinas Criollos variety. The colored fat was originally intended to replace the dende oil that imported slaves knew from Africa.

Hi Gary,

thank you ery much for you interesting comments. As I was reading you post I thought I the bright red dende oil used in some Brazillian dishes. I haven't used this, but by reputation it is delicious.

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