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« British Couscous | Main | Moorish Origin of Churros? »

January 06, 2010

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Jugurtha Azma

Hi! I am sorry but Kuskus (or Seksu, which is originally a Berber name) is an Amazigh (Berber, Kabyle) dish. Seksu has nothing to do with Arabs! To understand how Seksu was invented by the Berber women, you need to learn about Berber ancient mythology and culture in general. And again, there is no such people called Maures in North Africa: You have the native Berbers (Amazighs) and a small number of Arab invaders who arrived there in the 7th century. And not all Berbers are Muslims. Here are some links which may help you to broaden your knowledge on North Africa and its Berber original inhabitants:

1- http://www.tamurt.info/?lang=en

2-About Seksu: http://www.north-of-africa.com/article.php3?id_article=333

3-Couscous: about the etymology of the word - http://www.kabylia.info/history/couscous-about-etymology-word

4- Kabyle Government: http://www.kabylia-gov.org/?lang=en

5-Berber mythology: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berber_mythology

6- Egypt: origin of the Greek culture: http://www.north-of-africa.com/article.php3?id_article=419

7- Yorkshireman found to share DNA with African tribes : http://www.north-of-africa.com/article.php3?id_article=463

8- The Tassili n’Ajjer: birthplace of ancient Egypt? http://www.north-of-africa.com/article.php3?id_article=418

9- Herodotus (c.490-c.425 BCE): On Libya (i.e. North Africa) - http://www.north-of-africa.com/article.php3?id_article=141


Thank you

Best Wishes

Adam

This article does not address the origins of couscous, only the appearance of a dish with a similar name and cooking technique in SE-Asian.

I would be very wary of attaching ultimate invention of a dish as the only mark of authenticity. Many diverse groups of people cook couscous dishes all over the world. It is now a global dish. To imply that Sicilian, Jewish, Sardinian, Turkish or Brazilian couscous are not authentic because they are derivative is not something I am comfortable with.

Regarding ultimate origins of the dish, most research points to a West-African origin I believe. You can read about this history on Clifford Wright's site.

http://www.cliffordawright.com/caw/food/entries/display.php/topic_id/3/id/34/

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